Take Our Class to Work – The Learning Partnership

Lynch is proud to support #TheLearningPartnership: a nationally recognized organization. It is critical to provide young people with career exploration experiences, so that they are able to discover their professional interests and identify the skills they will require to be successful after school. The students of Glen Forest Secondary School were awarded a fabulous opportunity to learn about the art of engineering, hydraulics and fluid motion, the careers available to them in those sectors and their remarkable applications.

Lynch Sponsors IIBA Toastmasters

Surveys about our fears commonly show fear of public speaking at the top of the list. Lynch believes in providing our employees and community members with the opportunity to conquer their fears and step outside their comfort zone. Since 1924, Toastmasters International has helped more than 4 million people from around the world become more confident speakers and leaders.

IIBA Mississauga Toastmasters Club is open to members looking to participate in Toastmasters from a business analysis perspective. Meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month, from 7 to 9 pm in the Lynch Training Room.

The Toastmasters Education Program is based on a proven curriculum that enables members to develop communication and leadership skills one step at a time.

Take Our Kids to Work Day: November 2nd 2016 at Lynch

Lynch is committed to helping educate youth about the world of work. Research suggests that today’s students will have multiple careers over the span of their working years. To be successful, they will need to master both new technologies and complex social and organizational systems.

Take Our Kids to WorkTM is an annual program in which Grade 9 (or equivalent) students are hosted by parents, friends, relatives and volunteers at workplaces across the country every November.

Learning in school becomes more effective and relevant if students can see where their education might lead them in the future. Spending a ‘day in the life’ of a profession or workplace is a fun and fascinating way to explore the world of work, think about career options, and make informed educational decisions.

Each year, Grade 9 students across Canada spend a day job shadowing in the workplace of a parent, relative, or friend. Highlights of this year’s Take Our Kids to Work Day held at Lynch Headquarters included team activities, engineering software training, employee presentations, a tour of our automated facility and a meet and greet with our President.

The top 7 reasons that hydraulics will be around in another century – By Josh Cosford

In some ways, hydraulics is an ignored technology. The research dollars going into fluid power is miniscule compared to electronics, and although it’s partly because hydraulics is a mature industry, I don’t foresee this changing any time soon. Regardless, the benefits of hydraulics are high, so it will always have a place in our world, and I feel strongly enough about this to share my list of 7 reasons hydraulics will still be around in 2116.

1. Hydraulics have the highest power density of any mechanical transmission system in existence. This means the most force and power can be created from the smallest possible actuator. A medium-duty hydraulic cylinder with a 2-in. diameter piston will operate in the range of 1500 psi. A 2-in. diameter piston has an effective area of 3.14 in.², and every one of those 1500 pounds per square inch will work upon every one of those 3.14 square inches on the piston. Quick math results in that little 2-in. cylinder being able to push more than 4700 pounds of force, which could lift your 7-series BMW without breaking a sweat.

To be honest, 1500 psi is not a lot of pressure. Most off-highway machinery runs over 4000 psi, such as in excavators or loaders. This same 2-in. bore cylinder could now lift over 12,500 lbs, which is enough to elevate a John Deere 50D excavator itself. If you think that’s awesome, consider the cylinders used in the compact hydraulic tools industry, where they drop “pounds” altogether and start talking in “tons.” A single, 2-in. bore cylinder operating at 10,000 psi can create force to the tune of 15 tons; that’s 15 tons from something the diameter of a lemon.

2. Hydraulics will exist after the zombie apocalypse. In fifty years, when the Internet of Industrial Things is the norm, and then in a further fifty years hence when we are left with a fraction of our population non-dead from the undead, hydraulics will save the day. If and when electronics cannot operate, liquids will certainly exist for us to push through tubes and move things at the other end. Continue reading “The top 7 reasons that hydraulics will be around in another century – By Josh Cosford”